Enforcing conformity is risky

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Article Highlights

  • #CCSS: minding the price of uniformity could help spare us another bout of “Whoops that’s not what we meant to do!”

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  • Question: Should education standards and funding vary by state?

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  • Enforcing conformity is risky, says @aeieducation Hess re: #ccss.

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Editors Note: This piece first appeared in The New York Times' Room for Debate, The American Way of Learning, in response to the question: Should education standards and funding vary by state?

There are two competing impulses in education. One presumes that there is an optimal model of schooling that Uncle Sam should enforce, good and hard. The other insists that there is no one “right” model of schooling just as there’s no “right” kind of kid, and that schools and school systems should be designed to serve their students and communities. I’m partial to this second view, myself.

What’s that have to do with the question at hand? Well, it’s true that school funding and standards don’t dictate how schools go about the stuff of teaching and learning. And there’s no obvious complaint against schools having equal resources or striving toward a common, rigorous bar when it comes to reading and math.

But things quickly get more complicated for those of us skeptical of the virtues of one-size-fits-all school reform. First, remember the golden rule—“he who has the gold makes the rules”—and that only the federal government can ensure funding equality across states. Of course, long experience teaches that federally funded activities are subjected to increasingly prescriptive federal direction.

Second, common standards are nice in theory, but they only matter when married to common tests. By design, such exams will require that every school, everywhere, cover the prescribed content in the prescribed sequence at the prescribed grade level — or risk winding up in the crosshairs when students test poorly. This will pose challenges, for instance, even for accomplished pilot, innovative or charter schools, if they happen to favor alternative approaches to the scope, sequence, shape and pacing of curricula.

Bottom line: I’m not at all sure that standards and funding should differ by state, but we’d do well to acknowledge that there may be unanticipated, adverse consequences when we seek to prohibit such variation. Given that education “reformers” have shown themselves all too prone to self-righteous groupthink, minding the price of uniformity could help spare us another bout of, “Whoops, that’s not what we meant to do!”

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About the Author

 

Frederick M.
Hess
  • An educator, political scientist and author, Frederick M. Hess studies K-12 and higher education issues. His books include "Cage-Busting Leadership," "Breakthrough Leadership in the Digital Age," "The Same Thing Over and Over," "Education Unbound," "Common Sense School Reform," "Revolution at the Margins," and "Spinning Wheels." He is also the author of the popular Education Week blog, "Rick Hess Straight Up." Hess's work has appeared in scholarly and popular outlets such as Teachers College Record, Harvard Education Review, Social Science Quarterly, Urban Affairs Review, American Politics Quarterly, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Phi Delta Kappan, Educational Leadership, U.S. News & World Report, National Affairs, the Washington Post, the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Atlantic and National Review. He has edited widely cited volumes on the Common Core, the role of for-profits in education, education philanthropy, school costs and productivity, the impact of education research, and No Child Left Behind.  Hess serves as executive editor of Education Next, as lead faculty member for the Rice Education Entrepreneurship Program, and on the review boards for the Broad Prize in Urban Education and the Broad Prize for Public Charter Schools. He also serves on the boards of directors of the National Association of Charter School Authorizers and 4.0 SCHOOLS. A former high school social studies teacher, he teaches or has taught at the University of Virginia, the University of Pennsylvania, Georgetown University, Rice University and Harvard University. He holds an M.A. and Ph.D. in Government, as well as an M.Ed. in Teaching and Curriculum, from Harvard University.


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