The climate change climate keeps changing, but the carbon tax is eternal

Article Highlights

  • There has been no temperature trend over the last 15 or so years despite increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.

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  • How wise is it to attempt to reduce the future effects of international price increases by imposing one upon ourselves in advance with a carbon tax?

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  • There is no long-term trend in sea-level increases despite rising atmospheric concentrations of GHG.

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Confronted with more data that contradict climate change orthodoxy, climate change alarmists still advocate a carbon tax, but with new rationales.

As the old saying goes, you don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows — or doesn’t blow nearly as much as in earlier years, as the data show for tornado activity in the United States, and for tornadoes and cyclone activity more generally. The global warming/climate change industrial complex, confronted with growing bodies of scientific analysis and data both inconsistent with climate change orthodoxy and difficult to dismiss, slowly is coming unglued, producing analyses that conflict and ancillary effects — in particular, the collapse of “carbon trading”programs — not helpful to the cause.

Consider a brief summary of the recent evidence on global climate patterns and attendant effects. There has been no temperature trend over the last 15 or so years despite increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHG). This actual record has belied the predictions of the models, yielding some uneasiness among the proponents of the conventional view. More generally, the earth has been emerging from the Little Ice Age since roughly 1850. Accordingly, there has been an upward long-term temperature trend: temperatures increased roughly from the middle of the 19th century through the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883, and then from about 1910 through about 1940. They were roughly constant through about 1980, increased until 1998 (a year with a strong El Niño), and have exhibited no trend since then. How much of this long-term upward trend is anthropogenic? No one knows, and those who claim to know… don’t.

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Benjamin
Zycher

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