No rest for China's military masters

Staff Sgt. D. Myles Cullen/US Air Force

Members of a Chinese military honor guard march during a welcome ceremony for Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Marine Gen. Peter Pace at the Ministry of Defense in Beijing, China, March 22, 2007.

Article Highlights

  • Chinese doubled down on their push to become #Asia’s most powerful country @michaelauslin

    Tweet This

  • The People’s Liberation Army will get a whopping $106 billion this year, according to official statistics @michaelauslin

    Tweet This

  • They can focus on their small neighborhood filled with small military powers & we'll remain the world’s policeman @michaelauslin

    Tweet This

While the rest of us watching defense issues were still trying to make sense of what the new Pentagon budget actually means, the Chinese doubled down on their push to become Asia’s most powerful country. The People’s Liberation Army (the overall armed forces, including the Navy and Air Force), will get a whopping $106 billion this year, according to official statistics. In truth, most China watchers think the numbers are closer to double that, once you factor in things like their growing space program and nerdy college boys cyberhacking everything in sight. True, the Chinese still fly four-engine prop bombers, but that’s just to take our eyes off of their developing stealth fighter (so stealthy that we apparently didn’t know it was ready to fly until it took off a few years ago when then-Secretary of Defense Robert Gates just happened to be in town), their new submarines, and their aircraft-carrier–killer missiles.

"China’s military budget has been growing by double-digit percentages for the past 15 years." -- Michael Auslin

All this is happening while we very publicly cut our defense budget, so the Chinese know the threat to them is declining. Yes, our budget still more than doubles theirs (or is five times the size, depending on which statistics you believe) — but all they have to do is focus on their relatively small neighborhood filled with relatively small military powers, while we remain the world’s policeman. Though at the rate we’re going, in a few years we’ll be spending more time eating donuts in the coffee shop than out patrolling the global streets. China’s military budget has been growing by double-digit percentages for the past 15 years. That it continues to do so when its No. 1 competitor is initiating a significant cut is about all you need to know that we may wake up sooner rather than later to an Asia in which our voice carries far less weight, and where China has the greatest influence.

Also Visit
AEIdeas Blog The American Magazine
About the Author

 

Michael
Auslin
  • Michael Auslin is a resident scholar and the director of Japan Studies at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he studies Asian regional security and political issues.


    Before joining AEI, he was an associate professor of history at Yale University. A prolific writer, Auslin is a biweekly columnist for The Wall Street Journal Asia, which is distributed globally on wsj.com. His longer writings include the book “Pacific Cosmopolitans: A Cultural History of U.S.-Japan Relations” (Harvard University Press, 2011) and the study “Security in the Indo-Pacific Commons: Toward a Regional Strategy” (AEI Press, 2010). He was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum, a Marshall Memorial Fellow by the German Marshall Fund, and a Fulbright and Japan Foundation Scholar.


    Auslin has a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, an M.A. from Indiana University at Bloomington, and a B.S.F.S. from Georgetown University.


    Follow Michael Auslin on Twitter.

  • Phone: 202-862-5848
    Email: michael.auslin@aei.org
  • Assistant Info

    Name: Shannon Mann
    Phone: 202-862-5911
    Email: shannon.mann@aei.org

What's new on AEI

image The Census Bureau and Obamacare: Dumb decision? Yes. Conspiracy? No.
image A 'three-state solution' for Middle East peace
image Give the CBO long-range tools
image The coming collapse of India's communists
AEI on Facebook
Events Calendar
  • 21
    MON
  • 22
    TUE
  • 23
    WED
  • 24
    THU
  • 25
    FRI
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 | 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Graduation day: How dads’ involvement impacts higher education success

Join a diverse group of panelists — including sociologists, education experts, and students — for a discussion of how public policy and culture can help families lay a firmer foundation for their children’s educational success, and of how the effects of paternal involvement vary by socioeconomic background.

Thursday, April 24, 2014 | 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Getting it right: A better strategy to defeat al Qaeda

This event will coincide with the release of a new report by AEI’s Mary Habeck, which analyzes why current national security policy is failing to stop the advancement of al Qaeda and its affiliates and what the US can do to develop a successful strategy to defeat this enemy.

Friday, April 25, 2014 | 9:15 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Obamacare’s rocky start and uncertain future

During this event, experts with many different views on the ACA will offer their predictions for the future.   

No events scheduled today.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.