A post-Chávez checklist for US policymakers

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Article Highlights

  • It’s time for US diplomats to begin a quiet dialogue with key regional powers to explain the cost of Chavez’s regime.

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  • US development agencies should work to identify the reforms that will be required to stabilize and rebuild Venezuela.

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  • The US must work to reinvigorate regional organizations committed to democracy which were neutered by Chavez’s agenda.

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With the impending demise of Venezuelan strongman Hugo Chávez, US policymakers should follow a rule that Chávez’s Cuban medical team ignored: Primum non nocere — First, do no harm.

The State Department should set aside any plans that would legitimize a successor regime in Caracas, at least until key demands are met:

•The ouster of narco-kingpins who now hold senior posts in government;

•The respect for a constitutional succession;

•The adoption of meaningful electoral reforms to ensure a fair campaign environment and a transparent vote count in expected presidential elections; and

•The dismantling of Iranian and Hezbollah networks in Venezuela.

Now is the time for US diplomats to begin a quiet dialogue with key regional powers to explain the high cost of Chávez’s criminal regime, including the impact of chavista complicity with narcotraffickers who sow mayhem in Colombia, Central America, and Mexico. Perhaps then we can convince regional leaders to show solidarity with Venezuelan democrats who want to restore a commitment to the rule of law and to rebuild an economy that can be an engine for growth in South America.

As Venezuelan democrats wage that struggle against chavismo, regional leaders must make clear that Syria-style repression will never be tolerated in the Americas. We should defend the right of Venezuelans to struggle democratically to reclaim control of their country and its future. Only Washington can make clear to Chinese, Russian, Iranian, and Cuban leaders that, yes, the United States does mind if they try to sustain an undemocratic and hostile regime in Venezuela. Any attempt to suppress their self-determination with Chinese cash, Russian arms, Iranian terrorists, or Cuban thuggery will be met with a coordinated regional response.

US law enforcement and prosecutors can do their part by putting criminal kingpins in jail or, at the very least, on the defensive so they cannot threaten or undermine a reform agenda.

US development agencies should work with friends in the region to form a task force of private sector representatives, economists, and engineers to work with Venezuelans to identify the economic reforms, infrastructure investments, security assistance, and humanitarian aid that will be required to stabilize and rebuild that country. Of course, the expectation will be that all the costs of these activities will be borne by an oil sector restored to productivity and profitability.

Finally, we need to work with like-minded nations to reinvigorate regional organizations committed to democracy, human rights, anti-drug cooperation, and hemispheric solidarity, which have been neutered by Chávez’s destructive agenda.

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