Khatami blocked from attending Mandela funeral

Reuters

Former president Mohammad Khatami arrives to vote during the Iranian presidential election in northern Tehran June 12, 2009.

Article Highlights

  • In practice, the security forces continue to control the movements of many prominent regime officials.

    Tweet This

  • Both Khatami and other prominent reform-leaning politicians found their passports revoked.

    Tweet This

  • Khatami served as Iran’s president between 1997 and 2005, even if he was largely constrained by the Supreme Leader

    Tweet This

Mohammad Khatami, perhaps the Islamic Republic’s best known reformist, served as Iran’s president between 1997 and 2005, even if he was largely constrained by the Supreme Leader and the regime’s hardline militias in the wake of the 1999 student uprising. During his successor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s first term as president (2005-2009), Khatami became an increasingly vocal voice of dissent against Ahmadinejad’s often caustic hardline antics and rhetoric. In the wake of the 2009 post-election unrest, however, such criticism from within the regime became too great for the Supreme Leader and his allies to tolerate. Both Khatami and other prominent reform-leaning politicians found their passports revoked and/or their adult children jailed in order to control their actions and to temper their statements to foreign media.

While the June 2013 election to the presidency of Hassan Rouhani heralded, according to some analysts, the return of the reformists, in practice the security forces continue to control the movements of many prominent regime officials. In the selected excerpt Mashallah Shamsolvaezin, the founding editor of many of the regime’s flagship papers, describes how his own travel ban was recently lifted, but how the ban remains on Khatami because, he says, of the complexity of protocol. That the impetus for the query about travel status was Khatami’s desire to attend the funeral of former South African President Nelson Mandela is an irony that will not be lost on Iranians who rightly or wrongly liken the detention, harassment, and restrictions so many former officials endure to those once borne by the South African dissident-turned-leader.

Also Visit
AEIdeas Blog The American Magazine
About the Author

 

Michael
Rubin

What's new on AEI

Holder will regret his refusal to obey the Constitution
image 'Flood Wall Street' climate protesters take aim at their corporate allies
image 3 opportunities for better US-India defense ties
image Is Nicolás Maduro Latin America's new man at the United Nations?
AEI on Facebook
Events Calendar
  • 29
    MON
  • 30
    TUE
  • 01
    WED
  • 02
    THU
  • 03
    FRI
Thursday, October 02, 2014 | 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Campbell Brown talks teacher tenure

We welcome you to join us as Brown shares her perspective on the role of the courts in seeking educational justice and advocating for continued reform.

Event Registration is Closed
Friday, October 03, 2014 | 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Harnessing the power of markets to tackle global poverty: A conversation with Jacqueline Novogratz

AEI welcomes you to this Philanthropic Freedom Project event, in which Novogratz will describe her work investing in early-stage enterprises, what she has learned at the helm of Acumen, and the role entrepreneurship can play in the fight against global poverty.

No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.