Obama's Inner Radical Unbound in Gates Cop Case

Renowned African-American scholar Henry Louis Gates's brush with the law will, thanks to President Barack Obama, reside in the history books.

By Friday afternoon, the story had spun so far out of control that Obama felt compelled to make a surprise appearance before the White House press, where he attempted to amend and roll back his remarks.

To update those returning from Mars, Gates, the Harvard professor, had an extremely unfortunate altercation with a policeman last week. A caller noticed two "black men" breaking into a home a few blocks from the university and called 911.

When Obama immediately assumed that the policeman was wrong, he implied that he thought that the officer was a racist and a liar.

In fact, Gates was trying to free a jammed door of his own home, with the assistance of his driver. When the police arrived, a confrontation arose between Gates and the responding officer that became so heated that the nerdy professor was arrested for disorderly conduct. The charges were ultimately dropped.

When Obama was asked in a Wednesday press conference to comment on the events, his first reflex was to criticize the officer, who, he said, "acted stupidly." But he also provided a thoughtful and accurate discussion of the historical context:

"What I think we know separate and apart from this incident is that there is a long history in this country of African-Americans and Latinos being stopped by law enforcement disproportionately. Race remains a factor in the society. That doesn't lessen the incredible progress that has been made. I am standing here as testimony to the progress that's been made; and yet the fact of the matter is that this still haunts us."

Igniting the Firestorm

Clearly, it was the unfortunate use of the word "stupidly" that created a firestorm, notwithstanding the nuances revealed in the complete answer. Why? Because the knee- jerk rejection to the policeman's point of view is the perfect metaphor for the Obama presidency.

We live in a nation of moderates, but are governed by politicians with views that are anything but. On the far right, there are many who think that everything the government does is always bad, unless it is being done by a government employee in a uniform. On the far left, there are many who think that everything the government does is terrific, unless it is being done by a government employee in a uniform.

Our government is broken because the far left and the far right are so busy trying to finish each other off that they have little time to devote to the nation's real business.

'Beyond the Bitterness'

President Obama was elected because he appeared to understand that. His victory speech after his Iowa caucus victory captured perfectly what Americans yearn for:

"You came together as Democrats, Republicans and independents, to stand up and say that we are one nation. We are one people. And our time for change has come. You said the time has come to move beyond the bitterness and pettiness and anger that's consumed Washington."

But after his victory, he has governed, at least on economic matters, mostly as a strident left-winger. He has sought to increase the power of the state at every turn. Hand in hand with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, he has focused on settling scores, on bitterness and pettiness, rather than bipartisan solutions for the nation's problems.

His agenda has been so extreme that "Obamunism" T-shirts have become a rage.

But he has done all that while continuing to appear cautious and reasonable.

Until that fateful press conference.

Lack of Information

It may be that only Gates and the police officer will ever fully understand what occurred that day in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Regardless of how boorish Gates may have behaved, the police officer probably shouldn't have arrested him. And it is even possible that race played a role, that if Gates were white he would have been cut more slack. But the only rational comment one can make is that there is not enough information available to form a conclusion about this episode.

And even as the Gates affair was developing, we received yet another reminder of how sensitive one should be about the stresses of police work when Jersey City detective Marc DiNardo died after he and four of his colleagues were shot while attempting to apprehend two suspects. A police officer never knows which call will be routine.

When Obama immediately assumed that the policeman was wrong, he implied that he thought that the officer was a racist and a liar. That is the type of sentiment that is common in the far left, that to this day celebrates people like Bill Ayers of the Weathermen, a group that among other things, bombed police headquarters in New York City in the 1960s. But it is far from the mainstream view.

Delivering Obamunism

America might have forgiven this intensely likable president for what might have been a slip at the end of a long news conference. But they could not because he had already given them Obamunism.

Instead, his remark served to confirm the worst fears of those in the middle. In his heart, President Obama is a radical leftist with no intent to govern in the manner that he promised during the campaign.

Which is why the Gates affair took the center of the public stage last week, and why it may well be viewed by historians as the defining moment of this presidency.

Kevin A. Hassett is the senior fellow and director of Economic Policy Studies at AEI.

Also Visit
AEIdeas Blog The American Magazine
About the Author

 

Kevin A.
Hassett
  • Kevin A. Hassett is the State Farm James Q. Wilson Chair in American Politics and Culture at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). He is also a resident scholar and AEI's director of economic policy studies.



    Before joining AEI, Hassett was a senior economist at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and an associate professor of economics and finance at Columbia (University) Business School. He served as a policy consultant to the US Department of the Treasury during the George H. W. Bush and Bill Clinton administrations.

    Hassett has also been an economic adviser to presidential candidates since 2000, when he became the chief economic adviser to Senator John McCain during that year's presidential primaries. He served as an economic adviser to the George W. Bush 2004 presidential campaign, a senior economic adviser to the McCain 2008 presidential campaign, and an economic adviser to the Mitt Romney 2012 presidential campaign.

    Hassett is the author or editor of many books, among them "Rethinking Competitiveness" (2012), "Toward Fundamental Tax Reform" (2005), "Bubbleology: The New Science of Stock Market Winners and Losers" (2002), and "Inequality and Tax Policy" (2001). He is also a columnist for National Review and has written for Bloomberg.

    Hassett frequently appears on Bloomberg radio and TV, CNBC, CNN, Fox News Channel, NPR, and "PBS NewsHour," among others. He is also often quoted by, and his opinion pieces have been published in, the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post.

    Hassett has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania and a B.A. in economics from Swarthmore College.

  • Phone: 202-862-7157
    Email: khassett@aei.org
  • Assistant Info

    Name: Emma Bennett
    Phone: 202-862-5862
    Email: emma.bennett@aei.org

What's new on AEI

image The money in banking: Comparing salaries of bank and bank regulatory employees
image What Obama should say about China in Japan
image A key to college success: Involved dads
image China takes the fight to space
AEI on Facebook
Events Calendar
  • 21
    MON
  • 22
    TUE
  • 23
    WED
  • 24
    THU
  • 25
    FRI
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 | 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Graduation day: How dads’ involvement impacts higher education success

Join a diverse group of panelists — including sociologists, education experts, and students — for a discussion of how public policy and culture can help families lay a firmer foundation for their children’s educational success, and of how the effects of paternal involvement vary by socioeconomic background.

Event Registration is Closed
Thursday, April 24, 2014 | 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Getting it right: A better strategy to defeat al Qaeda

This event will coincide with the release of a new report by AEI’s Mary Habeck, which analyzes why current national security policy is failing to stop the advancement of al Qaeda and its affiliates and what the US can do to develop a successful strategy to defeat this enemy.

Friday, April 25, 2014 | 9:15 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Obamacare’s rocky start and uncertain future

During this event, experts with many different views on the ACA will offer their predictions for the future.   

No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.
No events scheduled this day.