Taking the risk out of systemic risk measurement I

Abstract:

An emerging literature proposes using conditional value at risk (CoVaR) and marginal expected shortfall (MES) to measure financial institution systemic risk. We identify two weaknesses in this literature: (1) it lacks formal statistical hypothesis tests; and, (2) it confounds systemic and systematic risk. We address these weaknesses by introducing a null hypothesis that stock returns are normally distributed. This allows us to separate systemic from systematic risk and construct hypothesis tests for the presence of systemic risk. We calculate the sampling distribution of these new test statistics and apply our tests to daily stock returns data over the period 2006-2007. The null hypothesis is rejected in many instances, consistent with tail dependence and systemic risk but the CoVaR and MES tests often disagree about which firms are potentially “systemic.” The highly restrictive nature of the null hypothesis and the wide range of firms identified as systemic makes us reluctant to interpret rejections as clear evidence of systemic risk. The introduction of hypothesis testing is our primary contribution, and the results highlight the importance of generalizing the approach to less restrictive stock return processes and to other systemic risk measures derived from return data.

 

 

Taking risk out of systemic risk measurement I by American Enterprise Institute

 

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About the Author

 

Paul H.
Kupiec
  • Paul H. Kupiec is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he studies systemic risk and the management and regulations of banks and financial markets. He also follows the work of financial regulators such as the Federal Reserve and examines the impact of financial regulations on the US economy.

    Before joining AEI, Kupiec was an associate director of the Division of Insurance and Research within the Center for Financial Research at the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), where he oversaw research on bank risk measurement and the development of regulatory policies such as Basel III. Kupiec was also director of the Center for Financial Research at the FDIC and chairman of the Research Task Force of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision. He has previously worked at the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Freddie Mac, J.P. Morgan, and for the Division of Research and Statistics at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

    Kupiec has edited many professional journals, including the Journal of Financial Services Research, Journal of Risk, and Journal of Investment Management.

    He has a bachelor of science degree in economics from George Washington University and a doctorate in economics — with a specialization in finance, theory, and econometrics — from the University of Pennsylvania.

  • Phone: 202.862.7167
    Email: paul.kupiec@aei.org
  • Assistant Info

    Name: Brian C. Marein
    Phone: 202.862.5890
    Email: brian.marein@aei.org

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